HTTP Error 500.0 – The FastCGI process exited unexpectedly

Link

Came across this error today:

HTTP Error 500.0 – Internal Server Error C:\PHP\php-cgi.exe – The FastCGI process exited unexpectedly

I was working on a Windows Server 2012 R2 with IIS installed.

After installing PHP 5.6 the error occured when trying to access any php files.
So apparently you need VC++ 11 runtime for PHP 5.5 or newer.
the solution was quick, download, install and iisreset (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30679)

Make sure you download and install the x86 version (vcredist_x86.exe), PHP on Windows isn’t 64 bit yet.

If you’re running PHP 5.4.x then you need to install the VC++9 runtime (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5582)

 

 

 

Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI)

Unified Extensible Firmware Interface

For many years BIOS has been the industry standard for booting a PC. BIOS has served us well, but it is time to replace it with something better. UEFI is the replacement for BIOS, so it is important to understand the differences between BIOS and UEFI. In this section, you learn the major differences between the two and how they affect operating system deployment.

Introduction to UEFI

BIOS has been in use for approximately 30 years. Even though it clearly has proven to work, it has some limitations, including:

  • 16-bit code
  • 1 MB address space
  • Poor performance on ROM initialization
  • MBR maximum bootable disk size of 2.2 TB

As the replacement to BIOS, UEFI has many features that Windows can and will use.

With UEFI, you can benefit from:

  • Support for large disks. UEFI requires a GUID Partition Table (GPT) based disk, which means a limitation of roughly 16.8 million TB in disk size and more than 100 primary disks.
  • Faster boot time. UEFI does not use INT 13, and that improves boot time, especially when it comes to resuming from hibernate.
  • Multicast deployment. UEFI firmware can use multicast directly when it boots up. In WDS, MDT, and Configuration Manager scenarios, you need to first boot up a normal Windows PE in unicast and then switch into multicast. With UEFI, you can run multicast from the start.
  • Compatibility with earlier BIOS. Most of the UEFI implementations include a compatibility support module (CSM) that emulates BIOS.
  • CPU-independent architecture. Even if BIOS can run both 32- and 64-bit versions of firmware, all firmware device drivers on BIOS systems must also be 16-bit, and this affects performance. One of the reasons is the limitation in addressable memory, which is only 64 KB with BIOS.
  • CPU-independent drivers. On BIOS systems, PCI add-on cards must include a ROM that contains a separate driver for all supported CPU architectures. That is not needed for UEFI because UEFI has the ability to use EFI Byte Code (EBC) images, which allow for a processor-independent device driver environment.
  • Flexible pre-operating system environment. UEFI can perform many functions for you. You just need an UEFI application, and you can perform diagnostics and automatic repairs, and call home to report errors.
  • Secure boot. Windows 8 and later can use the UEFI firmware validation process, called secure boot, which is defined in UEFI 2.3.1. Using this process, you can ensure that UEFI launches only a verified operating system loader and that malware cannot switch the boot loader.

Versions

UEFI Version 2.3.1B is the version required for Windows 8 and later logo compliance. Later versions have been released to address issues; a small number of machines may need to upgrade their firmware to fully support the UEFI implementation in Windows 8 and later.

Hardware support for UEFI

In regard to UEFI, hardware is divided into four device classes:

  • Class 0 devices. This is the UEFI definition for a BIOS, or non-UEFI, device.
  • Class 1 devices. These devices behave like a standard BIOS machine, but they run EFI internally. They should be treated as normal BIOS-based machines. Class 1 devices use a CSM to emulate BIOS. These older devices are no longer manufactured.
  • Class 2 devices. These devices have the capability to behave as a BIOS- or a UEFI-based machine, and the boot process or the configuration in the firmware/BIOS determines the mode. Class 2 devices use a CSM to emulate BIOS. These are the most common type of devices currently available.
  • Class 3 devices. These are UEFI-only devices, which means you must run an operating system that supports only UEFI. Those operating systems include Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2. Windows 7 is not supported on these class 3 devices. Class 3 devices do not have a CSM to emulate BIOS.

Windows support for UEFI

Microsoft started with support for EFI 1.10 on servers and then added support for UEFI on both clients and servers.

With UEFI 2.3.1, there are both x86 and x64 versions of UEFI. Windows 10 supports both. However, UEFI does not support cross-platform boot. This means that a computer that has UEFI x64 can run only a 64-bit operating system, and a computer that has UEFI x86 can run only a 32-bit operating system.

How UEFI is changing operating system deployment

There are many things that affect operating system deployment as soon as you run on UEFI/EFI-based hardware. Here are considerations to keep in mind when working with UEFI devices:

  • Switching from BIOS to UEFI in the hardware is easy, but you also need to reinstall the operating system because you need to switch from MBR/NTFS to GPT/FAT32 and NTFS.
  • When you deploy to a Class 2 device, make sure the boot option you select matches the setting you want to have. It is common for old machines to have several boot options for BIOS but only a few for UEFI, or vice versa.
  • When deploying from media, remember the media has to be FAT32 for UEFI, and FAT32 has a file-size limitation of 4GB.
  • UEFI does not support cross-platform booting; therefore, you need to have the correct boot media (32- or 64-bit).

WSUS clients may fail during synchronization and log the following errors: 0x8024400D

Issue: WSUS clients may fail during synchronization and log the following errors: 0x8024400D

Cause: Too much rubbish in WSUS database eg. Lots and lots of expired and superseeded updates. No cleanup or maintenance has been done for a loong time.

Resolution:

Execute a maintenance CleanUp on the WSUS Server. Most of the 0x8024400D are due to a high quantity of updates on the server, even declined, expired, or superseded. This causes that the client WU Engine cannot finish processing all the information, and cannot pass to the Evalutation phase of the update process.

 

-Run Decline-SupersededUpdates.ps1 (Can also be found at www.thomasmarcussen.com – in the Archive folder). If the base Operating System is Windows 2008 R2 of further there should not be any problem to run it on Powershell 2.0

Instructions:

Open a Powershell windows as Administrator

Execute the next cmdlet in order to be able to execute non-signed scripts: Set-ExecutionPolicy -Scope Process -ExecutionPolicy Bypass

Execute the script using the next syntax: .\Decline-SupersededUpdates.ps1 -UpdateServer FQDNoftheWSUSserver -Port xx -SkipDecline

Example: .\Decline-SupersededUpdates.ps1 -UpdateServer wsus.domain.local -Port 8530 -SkipDecline

 

After the process finishes we need to run the WSUS Cleanup:

From WSUS Console, go to Options, and open WSUS Cleanup Wizard

– Select only the 4th and 5th option: Expired Updates and Superseded Updates

– After the process finishes, run the Wizard again, just selecting the 1st Option: Unused updates and update revisions.

You might have to run this multiple times, untill it stops giving timeout errors – in case you got A LOT of expired and superseded updates – I’ve put up a script to perform this task instead. – see this post: http://blog.thomasmarcussen.com/susdb-maintenance/

  • Check if the affected clients are running Windows 7 – 32 bit version.

In this case, we will need to ensure that they have at least the WU Agent revision from June 2015:                               (You can download it from Here: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3050265 )

  • – Clean the bloated update cache on the affected clients:

From a CMD as Administrator execute:

Net stop AppIDSvc

net stop wuauserv

net stop cryptsvc

ren %windir%\SoftwareDistribution %windir%\SoftwareDistribution.old

ren %systemroot%\system32\catroot2 oldcatroot2

Delete, in the registry: the PingID, SUSClientID and the AccountDomainSID values from HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate

Then execute:

net start AppIDSvc

net start wuauserv

net start cryptsvc

wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow

Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3.3 for Windows Server 2008 R2 available

Microsoft is releasing the iSCSI Target Server

This is a very cool tool, actually you can’t live without in home aka lab/testing env. 😉

The Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3.3 provides storage (disks) over a TCP/IP network. It turns a computer running Windows Server into a storage device which provides shared block storage. You can use Microsoft iSCSI Software Target 3.3 to perform a variety of storage-related tasks, including the following:

  • Provide shared storage for Hyper-V to enable high availability and live migration
  • Consolidate storage for multiple application servers (i.e. Microsoft SQL Server or Hyper-V)
  • Provide shared storage for applications hosted on a Windows failover cluster
  • Enable diskless computers to boot remotely from a single operating system image using iSCSI

Download:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=45105d7f-8c6c-4666-a305-c8189062a0d0

Managing Internet based Configuration Manager clients using Direct Access

Steve Rachui published another great post over on his blog, this time about using the Windows Server 2008 R2 Direct Access feature to manage Internet based clients of System Center Configuration Manager 2007:

“Do you have internet based clients that you want to manage?  Does the idea of switching to SCCM native mode to manage those client make you nervous?  Do you have Windows 2008 R2 servers in your environment and are the internet systems you want to manage running Windows 7 (Enterprise or Ultimate) or Windows Server 2008 R2?  If you said yes to all of these questions then you might just be interested in taking a look at Direct Access (DA).”

To read Steve’s excellent blog post see the following link:

Direct Access – SCCM – Managing internet clients

Add Office 2010 KMS Key to your KMS Server

Office 2010 will require either a MAK (Multiple Activation Key) or a KMS Key (the new volume lenience key, since Vista/Server 2008). You will only need one KMS server for your organization to serve out activations for both Windows Operating Systems and Office 2010.

1.

Download your Office Product and KMS Key from Microsoft Licensing

www.microsoft.com/licensing

2.

Download the Microsoft Office 2010 KMS Host License Pack

Download this .exe from Microsoft and install it on your current KMS server. It will ask you for your Office 2010 KMS key and then activate it against Microsoft’s Activiation Servers.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?
displaylang=en&FamilyID=97b7b710-6831-4ce5-9ff5-fdc21fe8d965

The Host Service Pack can only be installed on Server 2003, Server 2008 R2 or Volume Licence edition of Windows 7.

Once the key has activated you will receive a message indicating that the activation was successful.

3.

Let your clients with Office 2010 activate to the new KMS host key

You’re all set, your clients should now activate to your KMS server.

Conclusion

The KMS Host key for Office 2010 is somewhat different than that of the client OS’s, as it will only take 5 users running Office 2010 for the KMS to activate them, as compared to the 25 hosts required for client OS’s.
Also, if a client is off of the network and does not contact the KMS server after 180 days the user will receive a message when they open Office stating that the product is unlicensed, however, it will continue to work with no loss of functionality. Once the user connect to the network with the KMS host the error will go away and the re-activation process will be transparent to the end user.