Setting up the lab environment – Hyper-V

The host was installed with Windows Server 2016.
This means Hyper-V is a feature that we just need to enable – yay!

  1. Open a elevated PowerShell prompt
  2. Run the command: Install-WindowsFeature -Name Hyper-v -IncludeManagementTools -Restart

The command will automatically reboot once installed
NOTE: In some cases you will have to enable Intel-VT in BIOS.
You can read more about the system requirements here: Systems Requirements for Hyper-V on Windows Server 2016

For the actual setup of guests machines, I will be running mostly Windows Server 2016, Windows 10 and maybe a Linux guest or two.
Don’t forget to review: Supported Windows guest operating systems

Now to the Hyper-V Switch configuration:

I am going to add an external switch, as my client is already connected to the network on the correct vlan.
Keep in mind I got a seperat USB NIC with 2 Ports (USB 3.0 to Dual Port Gigabit Ethernet Adapter NIC w/ USB Port)
This means i will be able to have my on-board primary NIC only for management and use one of the other free ports only for VMs.

  1. Open Hyper-V Manger
  2. Mark your server
  3. Click Virtual Switch Manager in the actions pane
  4. Mark External
  5. Click Create Virtual Switch
  6. Name your switch – Example: External – 254 (254 indicating the vlan)
  7. Remove the checkbox in Allow management operating system to share this network adapter
  8. Mark: Enable single-root I/O virtualization (SR-IOV)
    Not familiar with SR-IOV? Read this blog post by John Howard: Everything you wanted to know about SR-IOV
  9. Click Ok
    You might get a warning that pending network configuration will prevent remote access to this computer – If your connected to the server using another NIC, you will not be disconnected.

This concludes the basic configuration of the Hyper-V host.
We installed Hyper-V and configured a switch with external access.

The next post will be more detailed with the actual Hyper-V guest installations

Setting up the lab environment – Deduplication

The next step for the lab or so-called home data center: Installing and Configuring Deduplication

I was going to use a USB stick for the Windows Server 2016 OS.
The main reason for this: DEDUPLICATION.

I did start out with a USB stick, but due to performance issues this was changed – read the follow-up post (http://blog.thomasmarcussen.com/follow-up-on-the-home-datacenter-hardware/)

The reason for having the OS on a separate volume: Deduplication is not supported on system or boot volumes. Read more about Deduplication here: About Data Deduplication

Let’s get started

Installing and Configuring Deduplication

  1. Open an elevated PowerShell prompt
  2. Execute: Import-Module ServerManager
  3. Execute: Add-WindowsFeature -Name FS-Data-Deduplication
  4. Execute: Import-Module Deduplication

Installing Deduplication

Now we installed data Deduplication and it’s ready for configuration.

My Raid 0 volume is D:
The volume will primarily hold Virtual Machines (Hyper-V)
I’m going to execute the following command: Enable-DedupVolume D: -UsageType HyperV

Enable Deduplication for volume

You can read more about the different usage types here: Understanding Data Deduplication

Some quick info for the usage type Hyper-V:

  • Background optimization
  • Default optimization policy:
    • Minimum file age = 3 days
    • Optimize in-use files = Yes
    • Optimize partial files = Yes
  • “Under-the-hood” tweaks for Hyper-V interop

You can start the optimization job and limited (if needed) the amount of consumed memory for the process: Start-DedupJob -Volume “D:” -Type Optimization -Memory 50

 

 

 

You can get the deduplication status with the command: Get-DedupStatus

 

 

 

 

The currently saved space on my volume is 46.17 GB
That is for a 2 ISO files and a reference machine for Windows Server 2016 and the reference disks copied to separate folder.

More usefull powershell cmdlets here: Deduplication Cmdlets in Windows PowerShell

I do love deduplication especially for virtual machines, hence most of the basic data is the same.
The disks are also rather expensive so getting the most out of them is preferred.